Fantasy Football: The Argument for 2QB Dynasty

Drew Brees

Imagine caring about Philip Rivers’ new four year contract extension with the Chargers.  Ok, that might be a stretch.  Let’s back it up and start over…

Recently it was intimated that due to 2QB dynasty leagues cropping up there’s more analysis of quarterbacks.  I have to totally agree with this.  In most dynasty leagues no one cares much about drafting a quarterback until later rounds if you can’t get Luck or Rodgers.  There are a lot of quarterbacks, they play for a long time and they score pretty similarly, right?  Ok you probably could win more leagues if you had an “elite” one like Rodgers, Wilson or Luck, but there are quite a few that fit the “elite” category if you think about it.  Has Roethlisberger moved in to the “elite” tier?  Maybe. But that’s an analysis piece for a different day.

Nobody knows.  The trouble I seen.

There are other reasons to set up your dynasty to be a 2QB dynasty.  In 2 quarterback dynasty leagues, quarterbacks are actually important again.  For instance, I’m in one dynasty league where we start one quarterback, two wide receivers, two running backs, a tight end, a kicker and a defense.  You might not have noticed while reading this, but I fell asleep shortly after typing “kicker.” Because those leagues are so plain-Jane and boring that, really, why bother?  I mean sure you can draft the same team over and over again with the usual league scoring, positions, lineups and all, but that must get old after a while.  It’s like having the same granola bar for breakfast every day for 30 years.  After a while, a doughnut or a cinnamon roll starts looking good.

In response the fantasy community has made some modifications such as getting a point per reception, adding individual defensive players and bumping up tight end scoring.  But while those changes are great, they continue to ignore the most important position in professional football: the quarterback.

A good quarterback is good to find.

All NFL fans know by now how important the quarterback is.  Teams spend a first pick in the first round on a quarterback 70% of the time since 1998.  Oh and by the way that quarterback selected first overall in 1998, Peyton Manning, is still playing.  If your NFL team doesn’t have a gifted quarterback at the helm, there’s very little chance your team is going to the Super Bowl.

It’s such a simple solution.  There are 32 NFL teams, and your league has to start 24 quarterbacks each week plus another 12 to cover bye weeks (do the math).  It makes the problem of a long-term dynasty solution to quarterback scarcity each week a real challenge for owners.  This also turns quarterbacks into a first round pick in the annual rookie drafts; just like in the NFL. Imagine if those first four highly sought after picks had quarterbacks added into them and suddenly the first seven picks are valuable.  That makes the draft itself more interesting for everyone as more than the first two to four picks suddenly now have top value.

If you did the math, with 32 NFL teams , 12 league teams, two quarterbacks each and two bye weeks you need to fill, you’ll note that there are weeks where some teams won’t have a starter.  One way a team can fill that seat is to trade for a quarterback on a rental basis.  To do this, two teams can form an alliance and trade a similarly valued starting player (like Frank Gore) back and forth in exchange for a third-tier quarterback to fill that vacancy.

Lastly, we all know that in dynasty leagues, wide receivers are king.  Very few would trade an elite wide receiver for a quarterback, but what if that quarterback would fill an empty starting spot for years and years?  Suddenly it starts to make sense.  Imagine drafting Drew Brees in 2001 and playing him for fourteen years.  During those years you can focus on wide receivers, running backs and tight ends while everyone else is trying to find the next elite quarterback.

Just do it!

If you’ve never been in a 2QB dynasty league, you should join one to see the fun wrinkle it puts in your strategy.  And if you’re going to start a league, consider requiring two QB starters as it (as well as things like point per reception scoring and partial point per carry) help to balance out the value of different positions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>