Fantasy Football: 2QB Dynasty League Intro – The first two rounds

2QB Dynasty

I’ll go over a bit more of that overarching strategy for 2QB dynasty soon.  But let’s look at a current draft to illustrate the format differences and how to exploit it.  Here’s a team that I’m currently in a draft for with 2QB dynasty format and PPR scoring.  In this draft format, it’s notable that 1.01 (my pick) and 1.02 were Andrew Luck and Aaron Rodgers.

Quarterbacks: Andrew Luck, Teddy Bridgewater, Sam Bradford, Zach Mettenberger
Running Backs: Todd Gurley, Tevin Coleman, Andre Williams
Wide Receivers: Devante Parker, Donte Moncrief, Charles Johnson, Josh Huff, Vincent Jackson
Tight End: Travis Kelce

The first thought that comes to mind is, “Sheesh, that’s not going to win anything”, right?  This team isn’t built to win decisively in year one.  It’s built to win year after year for the long haul.   There are twelve teams and only 32 starting quarterbacks.  I have three starting quarterbacks.  Someone’s not going to have a quarterback to start on bye weeks, and probably multiple teams.  Along with three STARTING quarterbacks, I have two top rookie RBs plus a starting RB in Williams, lots of promising young depth at WR (including the expected #3 rookie WR in Parker), a top five TE and enough veterans to cover bye weeks.  There are several more rounds of the draft ahead of us so I’ll need to get a backup TE and some late-round RB options, but this is shaping up perfectly.

It’s important to look way down the road when you enter a 2QB league like this.  Top quarterbacks are few and far between in the NFL.  Last year a guy in a league I’m in spent his fourth round startup pick on Johnny Manziel rather than having the freedom to use it on a developmental WR like Mike Evans, Sammy Watkins or Odell Beckham Jr – because he hadn’t gotten his second quarterback yet.  When you get a starting QB that is going to keep the job, you hold onto him like he was a diamond and it should cost a lot of capital to get one away from you.  If you don’t start with Julio Jones or Dez Bryant, don’t worry.  You can always trade that tenth round quarterback for a premium pick or elite prospect down the road.

As a last thought, front-loading your draft is just as important here as it is in other leagues, but for different reasons.  If you don’t get a pick in the first half of the first round where you can draft Luck or Rodgers, consider trading your middle or late first round pick plus a fourth or fifth for someone’s early to middle second round pick plus their third rounder.  This gives you two seconds to get top QB’s with and two thirds to start fleshing out the rest of your roster.

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