Understanding IDP Value- Dynasty

IDP (Individual Defensive Player) dynasty leagues are fast becoming the best way to get the most out of fantasy football. Rather than playing fantasy football with team defenses, you get to use linebackers, cornerbacks, safeties, defensive tackles, and defensive ends. Each of these players are awarded points for tackles, sacks, tackles for a loss, interceptions, forcing fumbles, and many more.

How your league scores each of these statistics and the number of defensive players you must start will determine the value of your player. To give an example, in some leagues cornerbacks and safeties are considered one position as a DB. Having CBs and Safeties in one position makes the position that much deeper taking away some trade value. Generally, you will not be able to get offensive players for defensive tackles, cornerbacks, or defensive ends in trades. They are looked at as scraps because an owner believes they can find the next top player at these positions through the waiver wire or draft.

Linebackers score the most out of all defensive players since they are always around the ball. The top linebackers in most leagues will outscore some offensive players. This gives linebackers the most value in the trade market when it comes to defensive players.

The confusion with IDP that I’ve learned is that you cannot base a trade solely on points. Yes points are points no matter if they are on defense or offense, but you must look at the value of the player as whole. Talent, opportunity, upside, and the potential for a player to improve, are things you take into account. Offensive players have more value than defensive players because defensive players don’t have a high enough ceiling. For example, Calvin Johnson was considered the top WR in fantasy for the last few years. You will not have the number 1 LB year in and year out. Even though defensive players may score more fantasy points than some offensive players, the way defensive players get the majority of their points is very difficult to repeat yearly. It is very difficult for them to repeat INTs, forced fumbles, fumble recoveries, and tackle numbers.

Regardless of the league’s scoring system, you have to understand that you are not going to get A.J. Green by giving up Luke Kuechly. I hate to burst that bubble. Even though Kuechly is a top scoring LB, it does not mean you get a top scoring WR. A defensive player’s highest potential scoring in a game is right around 20-25 points depending on the league. For a top offensive player, like Demariyus Thomas or Antonio Brown, that is right around their average point total. The ability for offensive players to be more consistent with their point average is another reason why offensive players are more valuable in trades to owners.

Let’s look at some potential trade examples:

Trade #1: Luke Kuechly finished as the 7th in scoring LB at 235 fantasy points for Victor Cruz in a league where he totaled 157.

This is fair value. As unfair as it may seem because of the large point differential, Cruz as proven that he can be a top 10 WR. With that potential, it makes Cruz that much more valuable than Luke.

Trade #2: Lavonte David finished as the top scoring LB at 265 fantasy points for Torrey Smith scored 166.

Now this is a trade that all depends on the owner. It will depend on positional needs and state of their roster. If I am the owner of Torrey Smith, I do not make this move, only because I value offense much higher than defense. However, you will find some owners that will take this deal, and you may even be able to get more. The difference between this trade and the trade above is the fact that it may seem as though Torrey Smith has reached his ceiling as a top 20-25 WR. While that is not a bad thing at all, for some owners, the lack of upside may be reason enough to part ways.

Trade #3

- Kiko Alonso finished as the 5th LB in scoring at 244 fantasy points, for Eric Decker finishing 8th in scoring at 238.

This offer will more than likely be rejected. At first glance this may look like a fair deal. However, no matter the scoring in various leagues, offense just has more value. The fact that the differential in points is not by a wide margin will make owners take into account how valuable good offense is.

The more players that you must start per position will also give each position more value. For example if you must start 3 LB’s, it will give more value to LB’s because the free agent pool will not be as deep. You do not need all of the studs on defensive. You can win easily with LB2’s like Perry Riley, Dqwell Jackson, and David Harris, if you have a top offense.

It is much easier to find top LB’s through the draft. This year for example, Kiki Alonso and Alec Olgetree were top 15 scorers. You can even turn to the waiver wire. This year’s example was Paul Worrilow. So don’t hold on too tightly to these LBs, or any defensive player for that matter. They are replaceable!

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